Sous Vide London Broil (2 methods) (get PDF)

 Learning is on a curve, and this is somewhat of a followup to the sous vide beef done in an old style crock pot. After concluding that sous vide is the way to go, especially for beef, I sprung for an 1100 watt Kitchen Boss sous vide cooker. After more than a dozen uses for beef, pork, and chicken, I believe I have made a wise buy!

I'll start from the beginning here, even though much of it is a duplication of the crock pot method. I'll keep the crockpot method available because there are some differences in cooking as well as searing. Take the learning curve with me!

I've fully documented two different methods for this, so I'll do a side-by-side explanation. You can pick one or the other, or mix & match!

Go number 1 Go number 2

1. The first step is to fully thaw the beef. When close to room temperature, I removed it from the packaging, dried it off with paper towels, and cut slits in it to insert garlic slivers.

1. The first step is to fully thaw the beef. When close to room temperature, I removed it from the packaging, dried it off with paper towels, and thoroughly covered all surfaces with my coffee rub. (see coffee rub recipe in 'rubs and sauces')

2. Vacuum-seal the beef, or if you do not have a vacuum sealer, you can put this in a ziploc bag, closing it with all of the air out of the bag.

2. Vacuum-seal the beef, or if you do not have a vacuum sealer, you can put this in a ziploc bag, closing it with all of the air out of the bag. Vacuum-seal the beef, or if you do not have a vacuum sealer, you can put this in a ziploc bag, closing it with all of the air out of the bag.

3. Now off to the sous vide station; I set my Kitchen Boss to 130° for 6 hours. The temperature is the doneness and the time is the tenderness. I am using a london broil here, so I need to tenderize it somewhat. Note that I use office clips to hold the bag in place.

3. Now off to the sous vide station; I set my Kitchen Boss to 130° for 5 hours. The temperature is the doneness and the time is the tenderness. I am using a london broil here, so I need to tenderize it somewhat. Note that I use office clips to hold the bag in place.

4. After 6 hours are up, I removed the beef from the sealed bag, dried it off a bit, and placed it in a cast iron pan with some butter. I'm going to use the torch searing method here so I took this outside. The grill seemed to be a good place to do this even though I will not be using the grill to sear.

 

 

4. After 5 hours are up, I removed the beef from the sealed bag and dried it off a bit by dabbing with paper towels, being careful not to wipe off the rub. I then placed it in a cast iron pan with some butter. I'm going to pan-sear this, but will use my Go Plus 100,000 btu propane searing stove to do th initial sear rathr than do it on the kitchen stove.

5. I've been looking into a Searzall, but reviews have not been stellar, and is way overpriced. I looked into a few other similiar products, but most are cheap Chinese knockoffs according to reviews. Having a flame spreader tip for my propane torch, I decided to try it out. I had already seared meat with a standard tip, so I thought this might work better. It did.
I did fabricate a flame spreader out of heavy gauge aluminum, modeled after a searing tool I saw online. The design worked well, but during my trial, the aluminum melted! That's when I remembered I had a flame spreader in a kit somewhere.
While searing, I regularly rolled the beef around in the melted butter, and seared the buttery sides. You can pan sear this as well, but I'm currently checking out the torch method.

5. After pan-searing with the Go Plus, I touched up the edges with a torch. I didn't bother to use the spreader tip because I wasn't searing the entire surface, just a few spots here and there.

6. Here is my london broil completely seared. As a further note, there are plusses and minuses to searing this way compared to searing on the stove (see crockpot method). This method creates a thinner sear so the meat is not cooked further internally, and it doesn't create a lot of smoke in the kitchen. The down side is that it is difficult to properly spoon the butter over the meat as it is searing.

6.

7. After letting the beef rest for a few minutes, it is time for slicing.

7. After letting the beef rest for a few minutes, it is time for slicing.

8. After slicing, it is, of course, time for eating! Accompaning our beef is some farfalle pasta and carrots, along with a salad.

8. After slicing, it is, of course, time for eating! Accompaning our beef is some tumeric pasta and mixed beans, along with a salad.

 

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